African Wildlife Foundation
Our Mission

Our Mission

The African Wildlife Foundation, together with the people of Africa, works to ensure the wildlife and wild lands of Africa will endure forever. 

  • Spread the word

pie chart

How we use donations

88% Programs
9% Fundraising
3% Administrative

View Annual Report

Donate With Confidence

Show me an Africa that's

Where We Work

Learn more

Where We Work

Hippopotamus

Hippopotamus
What Will Our Conservation Story Be?

What Will Our Conservation Story Be?

For those who often read about the state of wildlife today, the narrative isn’t always a happy one—in fact, more often than not it’s just the opposite.

In case anyone isn’t familiar with the current story, let me provide a quick table

Read More

Blog

All blogs

Elephant

Elephant
AWF Supports Kenya’s Decision to Destroy Ivory and Rhino Horn

AWF Supports Kenya’s Decision to Destroy Ivory and Rhino Horn

On 30 April, the Kenyan government, with sponsorship from the African Wildlife Foundation, will destroy 105 tons of ivory and 1 ton of rhino

Read More

News

All news

Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros
Featured Projects
Chyulu Hills REDD+

In Africa, deforestation and climate change give real cause for concern.

The African continent is anticipated to experience more than its fair share of climate change’s negative impacts. From extreme weather patterns to losses in crop productivity to an overall decrease in the quality of life for both the people and wildlife that call Africa...

Read more

Featured Projects

All projects
Did you know?
Africa will bear the brunt of negative impacts from climate change.
Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Did you know?
All wildebeest populations have declined except those in the Serengeti. 

Zambezi

Zambezi
Conservation Challenges

Beyond Wildlife Trafficking: Other Conservation Challenges

When left to its own devices, nature does a remarkable job of taking care of itself. Consider Chernobyl, the Russian city that was permanently evacuated when a nuclear power plant exploded in 1986. According to a study in the October 2015 issue of the journal,

Read More

Blog

All blogs

A Changing Africa

Watch

A Changing Africa

Living Alongside Carnivores

Though they live next to Tanzania’s largest national park, residents in the villages surrounding Ruaha National Park see no benefits from the presence of wildlife, particularly carnivores.

And there are plenty of carnivores here: The area supports a

Read More

Blog

All blogs
Did you know?
Deforestation affects Africa at twice the global average. 
Featured Projects
Canine Detection Unit

Poaching epidemic threatens elephants and rhinos.

Illegal poaching in Africa is at an all-time high, with elephants and rhinos targeted by well-funded, -trained and -equipped poachers who are motivated by a lucrative illegal wildlife trade. The poaching of rhinos has increased nearly 3,000 percent since 2007 and demand for ivory is also ever climbing. If...

Read more

Featured Projects

All projects

Simien Mountains

Simien Mountains

West African Giraffe

West African Giraffe
Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Dja

Dja

Hedgehog

Hedgehog
Safari truck

10 Tips for Practicing Sustainable Tourism on Safari

An African safari is an adventure everyone should experience at least once. In order for that to be a possibility for future generations, it’s important for all guests to practice sustainable tourism. Since 1981, AWF partner Thomson Safaris has been a leader

Read More

Blog

All blogs

Vulture

Vulture
Bwindi Mountain Gorilla Census

Bwindi Mountain Gorilla Census

Accurate population numbers are needed for gorilla conservation. 

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda is home to approximately half of the world’s remaining...

Read More

Projects

All projects

Climate Change

Climate Change
Featured Projects
Ruaha Carnivore Project

A critical location for Africa’s top predators.

Across the continent, Africa’s large carnivores are facing an uncertain future. Lions, cheetahs and African wild dogs have all disappeared from 80 – 90 percent of their original range. Both the lion and the cheetah are now classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN, with as few as 23,000 and 10,000...

Read more

Featured Projects

All projects

Fischer's Lovebird

Fischer's Lovebird

Bili Uele

Bili Uele
Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

loading
SHOW ME MORE