Our Mission

Our Mission

The African Wildlife Foundation, together with the people of Africa, works to ensure the wildlife and wild lands of Africa will endure forever. 

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How we use donations

85% Programs
9% Fundraising
6% Administrative

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Where We Work

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Where We Work

Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros
Stephanie Schuttler collecting a small piece of forest elephant dung to be used for DNA extraction.

The ABC’s of Elephant DNA

My previous blogs have brought up how difficult forest elephants are to see, and therefore study. Much of the research on forest elephants has actually been on their dung to obtain information about the elephant.

Forest elephants defecate roughly 17-20 times

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Blog

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Elephant

Elephant
Hong Kong Retail Chain Drops Ivory

Hong Kong Retail Chain Drops Ivory

Chinese Arts & Crafts (H.K.) Ltd. (CAC), Hong Kong’s largest ivory retailer, stopped selling elephant ivory according to a statement

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News

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Hippopotamus

Hippopotamus
Featured Projects
Limpopo Leopard Conservation

Little is known about the leopard’s conservation status.

Leopards are solitary, nocturnal creatures that prefer to live in dense bush where their camouflage helps them to hide effectively. It is for these reasons, perhaps, that there is little information available regarding leopard populations and their current conservation status.

Once found in...

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Featured Projects

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Did you know?
Predator-proof bomas have been used to lessen human-carnivore conflict. 
Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Virunga

Virunga
Did you know?
All wildebeest populations have declined except those in the Serengeti. 
Winner Announced in WILD to INSPIRE Short Film Competition

Winner Announced in WILD to INSPIRE Short Film Competition

Nat Geo WILD, the Sun Valley Film Festival and the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) announced today that the short film Wolf Mountain

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News

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West/Central Africa

West/Central Africa
A profile of a Western lowland gorilla

Meeting the Western Lowland Gorillas

The mountain gorillas of the Virungas are often described as living in a giant salad bowl. The lowland gorillas also live in the midst of their favorite food source—the broad-leafed marantaceae scrub.

After four hours of tough trekking, our safari

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Blog

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Bat-Eared Fox

Bat-Eared Fox
Featured Projects
Cameroon Elephant Anti-Poaching

Faro National Park under threat.

In February 2012, heavily armed poaching gangs from Sudan massacred more than 50% of the elephants in northern Cameroon’s Bouba N’djida National Park. While Faro National Park avoided the elephant massacre, financial and technical shortfalls—not to mention its location near the border of Nigeria—make...

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Featured Projects

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Did you know?
Rare today, herds of 100 or more roan antelopes were common in the past. 
Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Mau Forest

Mau Forest

Fischer's Lovebird

Fischer's Lovebird
AWF Conservation Management Trainee George Okwaro plants trees in the Mau Forest Complex

Catching Up With Our First Class of Conservation Management Trainees

After more than a year of training and field experience, the first round of AWF Conservation Management Trainees has already amassed a wealth of experience.

George Okwaro

Trainee George Okwaro most recently supported the Mau reforestation project in

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Blog

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Waterbuck

Waterbuck
Bwindi Mountain Gorilla Census

Bwindi Mountain Gorilla Census

Accurate population numbers are needed for gorilla conservation. 

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda is home to approximately half of the world’s remaining...

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Projects

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West African Giraffe

West African Giraffe
Featured Projects
Say No Campaign

An insatiable demand for wildlife products.

Poaching of many of Africa’s iconic species has reached an all time high. With more than 35,000 elephants poached in Africa in 2012 and 668 rhinos poached the same year in South Africa alone, elephant and rhino populations are approaching a tipping point. Consumption of ivory and rhino horn, in addition to...

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Featured Projects

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Limpopo

Limpopo
Did you know?
Africa will bear the brunt of negative impacts from climate change.
Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

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