African Wildlife Foundation
Our Mission

Our Mission

The African Wildlife Foundation, together with the people of Africa, works to ensure the wildlife and wild lands of Africa will endure forever. 

  • Spread the word

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How we use donations

85% Programs
9% Fundraising
6% Administrative

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Where We Work

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Where We Work

Hippopotamus

Hippopotamus
Lessons Learned from REDD+

Lessons Learned from REDD+

AWF has implemented a number of climate change projects in Africa, including ones that involve Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). But if there’s one thing to know about REDD+, it’s that it is an evolving science. AWF

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Blog

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Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros
Ivory Traffickers in Zambia Jailed 5 Years

Ivory Traffickers in Zambia Jailed 5 Years

A magistrate’s court in Zambia has sentenced five men to five years in jail after they were arrested by the Zambia

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News

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Elephant

Elephant
Featured Projects
Limpopo Leopard Conservation

Little is known about the leopard’s conservation status.

Leopards are solitary, nocturnal creatures that prefer to live in dense bush where their camouflage helps them to hide effectively. It is for these reasons, perhaps, that there is little information available regarding leopard populations and their current conservation status.

Once found in...

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Featured Projects

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Did you know?
Africa will bear the brunt of negative impacts from climate change.
Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Did you know?
Deforestation affects Africa at twice the global average. 

East Africa

East Africa
Students celebrate the grand opening of Ilima Conservation School

Ilima, an Example to Follow

It goes without saying that emphasizing the link between education and conservation is not a fruitless endeavor. The desired outcome is a community which consciously chooses to look after its forest as a heritage for its children, its children’s children,

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Blog

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Did you know?
Predator-proof bomas have been used to lessen human-carnivore conflict. 
School girls perform a dance at the grand opening of the Ilima Conservation School.

A New Source of Hope in Ilima

You don’t know the meaning of the word excitement unless you’ve ridden on the back of a dirt bike for six hours through a rough forest path in a remote area of the Democratic Republic of the Congo—and you can’t know terror until you’

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Blog

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Investment in Africa

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Investment in Africa
Featured Projects
African Wild Dog Scouts

Wild dogs in danger.

The African wild dog is seriously endangered due to human-carnivore conflict. Hunting and habitat loss has left fewer than 5,000 wild dogs in all of Africa, as their historic range has shrunk almost 90%. To combat the rapid decline of these carnivores, African Wildlife Foundation is working to understand threats and challenges facing...

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Featured Projects

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Mau Forest

Mau Forest
Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Limpopo

Limpopo

Fischer's Lovebird

Fischer's Lovebird
A white rhino bonds with her calf

Coming Together in the Face of Mass Extinction

“My film is going to be a failure if people aren’t changed,” Louie Psihoyos told AWF staff gathered in a conference room in Washington, DC a few weeks ago.  The DC Environmental Film Festival had just come to a close, and the Academy

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Blog

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Waterbuck

Waterbuck
Elephants in Arusha National Park

The Silent Killer of Africa's Wildlife

The following is an excerpt from "Habitat Loss: Wildlife's Silent Killer and the Central Role Protected Areas Play on Biodiversity Protection in Africa," a chapter written by AWF's Vice President of Conservation Strategy, Kathleen

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Blog

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West African Giraffe

West African Giraffe
Featured Projects
Rhino Sanctuary at Hluhluwe iMfolozi

Even protected areas are not completely safe from poaching. 

Hluhluwe iMfolozi Park, in South Africa, is one of the flagship protected areas of the Ezemvelo KwaZulu–Natal Wildlife, the provincial nature conservation authority for the KwaZulu–Natal Province. The park was founded specifically to protect the world’s remaining populations...

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Featured Projects

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Did you know?
Rare today, herds of 100 or more roan antelopes were common in the past. 
Did you know?
All wildebeest populations have declined except those in the Serengeti. 
Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

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