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If a rhino could speak he’d beg the world to stop poaching

African Wildlife Foundation is committed to a holistic, three-pronged approach to saving Africa’s most threatened species. That means we not only stop the killing by protecting species, like the rhinoceros, on the ground but also work to stop wildlife trafficking and stop the demand.

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Collaring lions for conservation in Tanzania’s Manyara Ranch

Africa’s lion populations have undergone a major loss in the last two decades. According to IUCN data, the lion's population numbers have decreased 42 percent in just 21 years, and threats continue to mount.As habitat loss, human-wildlife conflict, and poaching continue to threaten the big cat’s existence, it’s become more important than ever to closely track this oftentimes-elusive species.

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African tourism is conservation's best friend

Africans traveling around the continent is the next big thing. African tourism is also projected to grow by 55 percent over the next ten years.

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Piloting anti-poaching in Africa’s biosphere reserves

Image of conservationists trekking in Dja Biosphere Reserve

Poaching and the unsustainable hunting of wildlife threaten biodiversity and the long-term viability of Africa’s ecosystems. Many species are also hunted for bush meat, affecting the continued survival of those key populations. It is estimated that the national value of the bush meat trade, widely practiced in sub-Saharan Africa, ranges from US $42 million to US $205 million across countries in West and Central Africa.

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Kwita Izina: 6 facts you need to know about the gorilla naming

At the base of Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park, infant mountain gorillas were celebrated during the Kwita Izina naming ceremony.

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