Posts by Andrea Athanas | African Wildlife Foundation
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Posts by Andrea Athanas

Looking Ahead to the World Conservation Congress

Giraffe in the Maasai Steppe

As storm clouds loom on the horizon, the global conservation community comes together in Hawaii for the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) World Conservation Congress (WCC). Our planet is at the crossroads. Where will we go from here? Is our chosen development path one that will lead to sustainability, prosperity and inclusive and green growth? Will we find ways to ensure communities are resilient and ecosystems restored?

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In Tanzania, Conservation Benefits Communities

In Tanzania, Conservation Benefits Communities

Since supporting the establishment of the College of African Wildlife Management (Mweka) on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro in 1963, AWF has continued to work with the government of Tanzania and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to implement conservation efforts in northern Tanzania. Together, we have delivered a legacy of conservation and development impact in the Maasai Steppe and Kilimanjaro landscapes.

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The Conservation Opportunities of Growth Corridors

Growth Corridors as Opportunities for Conservation in Africa

A wheel can take you forward, or it can take you backward. The direction depends on how you roll it. Growth corridors are similar to wheels in that they can take you forward or backward depending on how they develop.

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Protecting the Protectors of Africa’s World Heritage

Protecting the Protectors of Africa’s World Heritage

AWF’s Andrea Athanas is currently attending the 39th Session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee Meeting in Bonn, Germany.

Everyone in the chamber stood and the room fell silent—you could have heard a pin drop. 

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Agriculture for Conservation

Conservation agriculture

A recent meeting with the Grow Africa team at the World Economic Forum brought home the urgent need to find sustainable pathways for feeding a growing global population while not mortgaging the earth. Africa is eyed for filling the gap, with low average yields per hectare, limited infrastructure, and (by some accounts) abundant 'unused' land. 

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