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Posts by msamodelov

AWF Women Champion Conservation in Africa

AWF highlights three women from its Conservation Leadership and Management Program

As AWF Trustee Myma Belo-Osagie wrote in her International Women’s Day blog post at the beginning of the month, women in Africa must step up and engage in conservation on the continent. Without their involvement on today’s most pressing matters—such as sustainable development and economic growth, and how conservation fits into these contexts—she argues that Africa risks being left behind the rest of the world.

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Why We Need Healthy Ecosystems

Wildlife and humans alike depend on ecosystems for survival

While poaching often receives more attention in the news, habitat destruction represents a more serious, persistent threat to wildlife. Species from elephants to egrets need adequate space and healthy land to thrive.

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Linking Conservation and Education

Students have a bright, comfortable learning environment at Adisge Primary School

Today, March 3, is World Wildlife Day—a recognition of the need to protect the many wildlife species with whom we share the planet. This year’s theme: “Listen to the young voices.” With nearly 25 percent of the global population between the ages of 10 and 24, young people have a significant role to play in protecting endangered wildlife—now and in the future.

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How Censuses Support Wildlife Conservation

Elephants in front of aircraft used to conduct the censes

For the past two weeks, AWF participated in an aerial census conducted by the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) in the Tsavo–Mkomazi ecosystem, which straddles the border between Kenya and Tanzania. This landscape hosts about a third of Kenya’s elephant population, and serves as a habitat for all of the species that make up Africa’s “big five.”

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The United States’ Little Known Role in Wildlife Crime

ivory and zebra pelt on table

Valued at an estimated $10–$20 billion per year, the global illegal wildlife trade is said to be the fourth-largest illegal trade in the world. To date, much attention has been focused on consumer countries in Asia, a major destination for a wide variety of wildlife contraband.

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