Posts Tagged East Africa | African Wildlife Foundation
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Posts Tagged East Africa

Catching Up With Our First Class of Conservation Management Trainees

AWF Conservation Management Trainee George Okwaro plants trees in the Mau Forest Complex

After more than a year of training and field experience, the first round of AWF Conservation Management Trainees has already amassed a wealth of experience.

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Linking Tourism and Conservation

Satao Elerai Lodge in AWF's Kilimanjaro landscape

To some African communities, the presence of wildlife is perceived as a threat to their livelihoods. Elephants are crop eating, water tank tipping nuisances. Lions are cattle attacking predators. Routine chores involve the added danger of stumbling upon a hippo or crocodile at the riverbank.

To others, where there is wildlife, they see opportunity. For many African nations, tourism is one of the fastest-growing economic sectors. In fact, Tanzania’s earnings topped 1.88 billion US Dollars in 2013, superseding gold as their number one foreign exchange earner.

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Banking on Women

Nasaruni Savings and Credit Cooperative Organization, an African Wildlife Foundation project in Kenya

When AWF helped the women of Kijabe Group Ranch start up a financial services organization back in 2009, little could we have predicted the immense impact the bank would have on the entire community. In 2007, we’d helped open The Sanctuary at Ol Lentille, a high-end lodge that provided community employment and income, after the community had set aside some communal lands for conservation.

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Celebrating Kenya's New Wildlife Conservation and Management Bill

Elephant tusk close up. Photo by Billy Dodson

The conservation community had even more reason to celebrate during the holiday season as Kenya passed a new Wildlife Conservation and Management Bill.

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Sniffing Out Wildlife Crime

A Kenya Wildlife Service sniffer dog finds rhino horn

By 2017, Jomo Kenyatta International Airport is expected to have 20 million people passing through it each day. That’s a lot of people. When that many people are passing through, there’s a huge likelihood of more rhino horn or elephant ivory passing through the airport and out of the country. It’s quite worrying.

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