Posts Tagged Kenya | African Wildlife Foundation
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Posts Tagged Kenya

Canines Stop Wildlife Traffickers in Their Tracks

Sniffer Dogs

In July 2015, the first class of dogs graduated from the African Wildlife Foundation’s (AWF) unique anti-trafficking program, the Conservation Canine Programme. The eight graduates are currently stationed in airports and seaports in Kenya and Tanzania, working closely with the wildlife authorities to diligently detect wildlife products bound for international travel. The enthusiastic canines sniff their way throughout these highly trafficked venues, searching high and low for contraband wildlife products.

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The Climate Change Road to Paris

The Climate Change Road to Paris

In two weeks an AWF delegation will join thousands of people from around the globe in Paris for the 21st Conference of Party on Climate Change. AWF is strongly urging all parties to support a binding and universal agreement on climate change.

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What Shall We Celebrate on World Rhino Day?

Rhino wanders Tanzania's grasslands

It is no way to kick off World Rhino Day. Little Bahati, from Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, had already been the victim of rhino poachers when they shot and killed his mother last year, taking her horns and orphaning the defenceless rhino calf.  

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The Frontline Warriors of Wildlife Trafficking

The Frontline Warriors of Wildlife Trafficking

Dick worked his way through the luggage with methodical and focused movements and quickly identified what he was looking for—a smuggled illegal piece of ivory.  His speed and agility are the sure-fire skills that will help tremendously in combatting the illegal wildlife trade that is ravishing the wildlife populations of Africa.

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‘People Say I Lost… But I Really Won’

Opening Ceremony of the Nasaruni Banking Hall in Kimanjo, Laikipia

As a young Samburu girl on the semi-arid lands of Laikipia in northern Kenya, Jane Putonoi could not shake the deep-rooted feeling that she had to serve her community. After witnessing time and time again the irreversible effects of traditional cultural practices like early marriage and female genital mutilation on her friends, relatives and other young girls in the community, Jane fast realized that education was her only sure avenue to achieving her goal.

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