Posts Tagged Kilimanjaro | African Wildlife Foundation
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Posts Tagged Kilimanjaro

Counting All Elephants

African elephants marching across the savanna

How a census aids in elephant conservation work

Count sheep. That’s the advice given to people having trouble falling asleep—a clear indication that most don’t consider counting animals an exciting task. Yet the counting of animals is crucial to conservation efforts. Wildlife censuses help gauge population patterns and distributions across habitats and time.

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Teaching and Learning, In Ways Both Old and New

Wildlife Warriors in Samburu with GPS tracking devices

In many of our landscapes, it’s not unusual to come across an individual dressed in full traditional garb—with a cell phone clipped to his belt. On the one hand, this image is startlingly incongruous. On the other, it’s the embodiment of how this continent works: embracing its cultural history while also welcoming future innovations.

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Africa’s Summer Bird: The White Stork

White stork. Photo by Alejandro Tawil

Birds of a feather will flock together, especially when they are trying to escape the cold, winters of Western and Central Europe.

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The Use of REDD+ in Achieving Conservation Goals

Chyulu Hills in Kenya

AWF’s climate change programme focuses on both climate mitigation and adaptation and the inclusion of climate-related impacts into AWF’s entire conservation planning framework. The development of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) projects, while not the entirety of AWF’s climate change efforts, is nevertheless an important tool in achieving these goals.

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Linking Tourism and Conservation

Satao Elerai Lodge in AWF's Kilimanjaro landscape

To some African communities, the presence of wildlife is perceived as a threat to their livelihoods. Elephants are crop eating, water tank tipping nuisances. Lions are cattle attacking predators. Routine chores involve the added danger of stumbling upon a hippo or crocodile at the riverbank.

To others, where there is wildlife, they see opportunity. For many African nations, tourism is one of the fastest-growing economic sectors. In fact, Tanzania’s earnings topped 1.88 billion US Dollars in 2013, superseding gold as their number one foreign exchange earner.

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