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Posts Tagged Land-Use Planning

Protecting forests by working with the people who live near them

Photo of rural settlement structures in forested areas near Lake Natron in Tanzania

    

Forest loss and degradation take various forms across the continent’s landscapes. Industrial logging, mining, and agriculture consume forests to meet the development goals of growing economies. They contribute to climate change and further degrade the forest’s health, resilience, and the services they provide.

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Restoring biodiversity hotspots in Uganda empowers communities

Close-up of lone chimpanzee in foliage

      

Sustainable agricultural enterprise, community conservancies, and education campaigns protect wildlife and natural resources across Uganda’s landscapes. Integrating these approaches with local economic growth ensures their continued success as they provide communities with opportunities to benefit from conservation.

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Supporting wildlife species in the face of climate change

Herd of African elephants, giraffe and marabou stork walking in dry Tsavo landscape

    

Shifting weather patterns have complex impacts on natural systems, many of which are the cornerstone of Africa’s economic developments as it grows rapidly. The continent’s biodiversity is a vital natural resource at stake as overall temperatures rise. With rainfall projected to increase in eastern Africa but significantly reduce in the south, the risk of flash floods and harsh droughts is high.

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Balancing wildlife conservation and livelihoods on Kenya’s group ranches

Pastoralist cattle grazing and people washing clothes at river in Samburu

    

Group ranches host significant proportions of Kenya’s terrestrial wildlife populations—including elephants that live outside or use lands beyond protected areas—and are predominantly inhabited by pastoralists. Since its implementation in the 1960s, the group ranch model has struggled to meet the demands of rising human and livestock populations and climate change impacts. Constrained by a lack of open space critical to their livelihood and facing dwindling prospects, group ranch pastoralists are increasingly sedentarized and diversifying into cultivation and tourism, often at the expense of wildlife populations and ecological processes.

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Improving Tanzania’s small-scale agriculture to promote biodiversity

Photo of crop fields in Kilombero, Tanzania

   

The population of the Kilombero District in Tanzania is heavily reliant on agriculture. Approximately 100,000 small-scale farmers cultivate predominantly rice and cocoa. On average, their fields are only around 0.5 hectares in size. Roughly 35% of the farmers are female. Economic dependence and lack of management knowledge lead to high losses during both harvest and processing, resulting in insufficient income.

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