• Spread the word

Blog

Life changing experience at the University of Oxford

  • 10/14/09
  • Nakedi

From arriving here five months ago, being introduced to all the wonderful people at WildCRU (great bunch of dedicated people) getting stung by nettles (in a touch rugby match), catching chicken pox (which was thought to be swine flu), and going on with the studies, studying at the University of Oxford has been a great experience. I find this place fascinating and rich of history. The landscapes and meadows look like they were painted by one talented landscape artist. I was shocked to learn that a 200 year old building is considered young around here.

Continue reading

Studying Conservation

  • 10/13/09
  • Erin
“I am a university student from Zambia trying to obtain my Ph.D. in animal ecology.  Is there any grant or scholarship you offer that can help me with payment for school?” -Jeremiah, Karasburg, Zambia, Southern Africa Yes! AWF is committed to improving the capacity of Africans for conservation management in Africa. For African nationals seeking their Masters or Ph.D.

Continue reading

A Window to the Heart

  • 09/11/09
  • Erin

A friend and I were recently watching a program about baboons and she mentioned that she heard of a baboon that has a heart on the outside of its body. Is there really a baboon in Africa with a heart on the outside of its body,  or was my friend pulling my leg?

--Anne, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A.

Continue reading

Leopard Sightings in the Kruger

  • 08/28/09
  • Nakedi
I wanted to give you a quick update while Nakedi is away: after a long time of not finding any leopards, and getting very discouraged, I was thrilled recently to get some great data on the leopards that use the concesson. A few of the camera traps at different times captured three different leopards--two males and a female. After encountering only tracks for the longest time, and wondering whether even these were just tricks of the eye, it was a great relief to see lepoards alive and well for the purposes of the project. The elephants of Kruger, though, are not so great for the project.

Continue reading

What's in a Name?

  • 08/14/09
  • Erin

“I recently discovered that a group of rhinos isn’t called a herd, like other animals such as elephants, but a crash. This got me to thinking: where do names for groups of animals come from? How do scientists come up with these kinds of names?”

--James, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.

Continue reading

Pages