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Dismantling Elephant Poaching in Lower Zambezi

Despite being home to one of the largest elephant populations in Africa, the Lower Zambezi ecosystem had not been experiencing significant elephant poaching.

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Advocating for Wildlife: A Conversation with President Sebunya

AWF President Sebunya

A son of teachers, Kaddu Sebunya was introduced to international affairs and global issues early in life—an introduction that initially started him on a career focused on rural development and humanitarian relief.

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Powerful Allies Join Forces for Wildlife

Rhino

The movement to end wildlife crime gained some powerful new supporters this month, as four companies announced commitments to fight illegal wildlife trafficking and joined the U.S. Wildlife Trafficking Alliance.

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Beyond Wildlife Trafficking: Other Conservation Challenges

Conservation Challenges

When left to its own devices, nature does a remarkable job of taking care of itself. Consider Chernobyl, the Russian city that was permanently evacuated when a nuclear power plant exploded in 1986. According to a study in the October 2015 issue of the journal, “Current Biology,” wildlife numbers in Chernobyl now appear to be higher than before the nuclear disaster, largely because of the lack of human presence. “This doesn’t mean radiation is good for wildlife,” says study coauthor Jim Smith, “just that the effects of human habitation, including hunting, farming and forestry, are a lot worse.”

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Canines Stop Wildlife Traffickers in Their Tracks

Sniffer Dogs

In July 2015, the first class of dogs graduated from the African Wildlife Foundation’s (AWF) unique anti-trafficking program, the Conservation Canine Programme. The eight graduates are currently stationed in airports and seaports in Kenya and Tanzania, working closely with the wildlife authorities to diligently detect wildlife products bound for international travel. The enthusiastic canines sniff their way throughout these highly trafficked venues, searching high and low for contraband wildlife products.

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