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Conviction rate for wildlife crimes in Kenya goes up

AWF donates scene-of-crime processing kits for wildlife law enforcement training

The conviction rate for wildlife crimes in Kenya has risen to 91 percent from 44 percent in 2013—according to the Office of Director of Public Prosecution—signaling a significant achievement in the war against poaching for government agencies and other conservation bodies.

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Making forest concessions work for local communities

The local communities of the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba (MLW) landscape in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) largely depend on the forest for their survival including agriculture, cultural value, and other non-timber forest products. However, the rights of these forest-dependent people to use the resources remain limited with little access to the exploitation of the forest, often hampered by complex regulations, thereby limiting the ability to benefit from the forestry operations.

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How Tourism Protects Biodiversity

Elephants roam in front of Satao Elerai Lodge

Today marks the International Day for Biological Diversity, as a good a day as any to celebrate the diversity of species and ecosystems in Africa. This year’s theme, biodiversity and sustainable tourism, coincides with the observance of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development.

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Corporations’ Critical Role in Conservation

black rhino

For the past several years, Africa has experienced unparalleled economic growth and entrepreneurship. As indigenous and multinational companies look to make their mark on the continent, they would be remiss to overlook the incredible value add of Africa’s wildlife and wild lands. Water catchments within Africa’s forests supply water to a third of the continent’s largest cities—supporting human life and economies.

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The Future is Now

Chiles and Tambara reflect on their roles at AWF

Like many early-career professionals, Sarah Chiles and Edwin Tambara are looking to the future. But where some may be thinking solely of their own prospects, Chiles and Tambara tend to focus on the bigger picture. They’re considering the rapid pace of development taking place in Africa and what that may mean for Africa’s wildlife and wild lands. And they’re especially aware of how their own actions may shape the continent’s path.

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