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Insiduous Weed Chokes Rangelands in East Africa

  • 07/01/99

East Africa's priceless rangelands for years have struggled against degradation caused by overgrazing and soil-depleting crop farming. Now ecologists are coming to grips with a third villain: the leleshwa weed, a fast-growing, tough-to-control shrub that is overtaking large sections of grassland.

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Six African Countries set up Force to Fight Wildlife Crimes

  • 07/01/99

Six countries in Africa have established the world's first international task force to combat poaching and other wildlife crimes.

The Republic of Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia agreed in March to empower the "African Interpol," as many call the task force, to help stop illegal trade in wildlife, the United Nations Environment Program announced recently.

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3 Births Bolster Numbers of Rare Mountain Zebras

  • 07/01/99

Cape mountain zebra were never very numerous to begin with, but back in 1950, their numbers had nosedived to a precarious 91. Intense conservation efforts began to reverse the decline, gradually raising their numbers to more than 400 by 1984 and to 1,200 today.

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Bwindi Reopens for Tourism

  • 07/01/99

After a month of mourning for the eight tourists and the park warden killed by Rwandan rebels in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, authorities reopened the Ugandan park to visitors Apr. 1.

The Uganda Ministry of Tourism, Trade and Industry (MTTI) declared the area safe after security measures were improved. A spokesman also said the government is committed to conserving the rare mountain gorillas that inhabit Bwindi.

Armed guards protected the 12 foreigners, including three Americans, who were the first tourists to visit Bwindi since the Mar. 1 attack by Rwandan rebels.

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Big Bulls 'Rehabilitate' Rowdy Teen Elephants

  • 07/01/99

Sometimes it takes a big, strong father-figure to get an unruly teenage male to shape up.

And that's not just in humans. Take the situation in South Africa's Pilanesberg National Park, where the matriarchal elephants a few years ago welcomed and nurtured the very young male orphans relocated from Kruger National Park.

But once the orphans became teenagers, the female group spurned them. Like unconstrained adolescents of many species, the males, their hormones ablaze, became seriously aggressive, even killing some rhinos.

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