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Posts by Didi Wamukoya

Pushing for stronger penalties to deter wildlife crimes

Photo of two white rhinos grazing in open savannah grassland in Botswana

  

Botswana’s Wildlife Conservation and National Parks Act (or the Wildlife Act) enforces the protection of wild species and natural habitats, with a particular focus on keystone species slaughtered for the illegal trade in wildlife products. Offenses against rhinos attract both the highest fine — BWP 100,000 ($ 10,000) — as well as the longest prison term of 15 years. Other offenses involving the illegal killing of wildlife, hunting without permits, trade in wildlife and wildlife products, and dealing in wildlife trophies carry high prison terms ranging from five to 10 years.

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Robust legal safeguards secure Botswana’s wildlife

Close-up photo of adult elephant amongst herd of elephants in Botswana

 

Botswana is indeed one of the success stories in wildlife conservation on the continent.  It has the largest population of elephants in Africa with about 200,000 individuals. To protect this large herd, along with other iconic wildlife species, the government has put in place strong measures to protect wildlife against criminal threats such as poaching and trafficking.  As African Wildlife Foundation’s Wildlife Law Enforcement team prepares for the Wildlife Judicial and Prosecutorial Assistance Training in Botswana from June 5-7, 2018, we recognize the strides that the southern African country has made to protect its wildlife. For example, the Botswana Defence Forces are committed to protecting wildlife and fighting poaching in protected areas.

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Mentoring wildlife crime prosecutors to ensure successful convictions

Photo of carved ivory and other illegal wildlife products seized

      

Monday, June 7, 2010 stands out clearly in my memory. I had just been appointed as a public prosecutor for wildlife crimes, and my first mission was to visit various courts and introduce myself in my new role. I started at Milimani Law Courts in Nairobi, where the Chief Magistrate kindly suggested that I sit in her courtroom for the morning session to acquaint myself — a relief, given that I had no experience in prosecution.

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A zero tolerance policy for wildlife crime

Photo of a lone elephant in semi-arid landscape in Samburu

  

As more countries recognize wildlife poaching and trafficking as serious crimes run by organized syndicates, they turn to the legal system to protect wildlife. Not only is legislation being strengthened across eastern Africa, but the capacity of law enforcement officers, investigators, and prosecutors is also strategically enhanced.

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Combating wildlife crime through effective prosecution

In March 2013, Tian Yia was arrested at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, and charged with the possession of two pieces of worked ivory weighing 16.6 kg. He pleaded guilty and was fined US$300. In January 2014, Leo Leilonge was arrested at the Addis Ababa Bole International Airport in Ethiopia and charged with possession of six ivory items. He pleaded guilty and was fined US$330.

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