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Posts Tagged Elephant

Balancing wildlife conservation and livelihoods on Kenya’s group ranches

Pastoralist cattle grazing and people washing clothes at river in Samburu

    

Group ranches host significant proportions of Kenya’s terrestrial wildlife populations—including elephants that live outside or use lands beyond protected areas—and are predominantly inhabited by pastoralists. Since its implementation in the 1960s, the group ranch model has struggled to meet the demands of rising human and livestock populations and climate change impacts. Constrained by a lack of open space critical to their livelihood and facing dwindling prospects, group ranch pastoralists are increasingly sedentarized and diversifying into cultivation and tourism, often at the expense of wildlife populations and ecological processes.

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Improving Tanzania’s small-scale agriculture to promote biodiversity

Photo of crop fields in Kilombero, Tanzania

   

The population of the Kilombero District in Tanzania is heavily reliant on agriculture. Approximately 100,000 small-scale farmers cultivate predominantly rice and cocoa. On average, their fields are only around 0.5 hectares in size. Roughly 35% of the farmers are female. Economic dependence and lack of management knowledge lead to high losses during both harvest and processing, resulting in insufficient income.

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Elephant population in the Tsavo-Mkomazi Ecosystem increases

After many gloomy days, finally some good news for the African elephant, buffalo, and giraffe.

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Addressing the issue of human–wildlife conflict

An elephant eating

While it’s often what gets the most attention, wildlife trafficking isn’t the only threat to Africa’s wildlife. As people and wildlife increasingly find themselves in closer quarters a new problem is intensifying: that of human–wildlife conflict.

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For Conservation in Africa, China is a Key Partner

Chinese government destroying ivory pieces

When, on Dec. 30, 2016, the Chinese government made public that it would halt its legal domestic ivory trade by the end of the coming year, it immediately attracted the attention of conservationists and the global media alike. As AWF and other conservation groups see it, the single announcement has the potential to completely upend the illegal wildlife trade.

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