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Kwita Izina: Checking in on 3-year-old mountain gorilla, SACOLA

  • 08/03/11
  • Anna

Three years ago this month, a baby mountain gorilla was given a name. It wasn't aware that it had received a name, as it was and still is a wild mountain gorilla living on the slopes of volcanoes in the appropriately-named Volcanoes National Park. This baby gorilla was given the name of SACOLA by Patrick Bergin, the CEO of the African Wildlife Foundation, on behalf of the coalition of the International Gorilla Conservation Programme as well as the people living in close proximity to the park.

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Machenje Lodge

  • 07/28/11
  • Becky

Working on safeguarding the land and its natural resources, the Trust has thus developed and moved forward, connecting the villagers directly to their land and its benefits. Through eco-tourism the Trust can accomplish this and bring in the profits made from wildlife viewing and tie them right back into the community, and in turn fuel more projects and efforts to conserve the area and aide the community.

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The Lupani School

  • 07/19/11
  • Becky
Thanks to the Sekute Trust and its work with AWF, the Lupani School has opened.  Opened on February eleventh of this year, the school has been a great success and a place of pride within the community.  Literacy is extremely low in the Sekute community, but with the Lupani School, including two buildings filled with class rooms as well as five houses for teachers, children now have access to receiving an education.  Students are learning about how to conserve and work with the land, and move towards a brighter future both fo

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Sekute Trust: Change and Power from the Grass Roots

  • 07/13/11
  • Becky
Driving out to the Sekute, AWF Regional Enterprise Manager Wilfred and I traveled to their Head office in order to talk with members from the Trust.

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Inyambo Fish Farm

  • 06/30/11
  • Becky
The first project I came to in Zambia, was the Inyambo fish farm.  Located within the western province of Zambia, in a village of 10,000 Lozi people, is a project that stands to strengthen the community, and also help to conserve fish stocks in the Zambezi River.  Lozi literally translates to mean water people, and it is surely a fitting name to a people so tied to the river.  A large village, they live very much traditionally, and fish daily along the Zambezi.  However, due to overfishing, fish stocks are rapidly declining, leaving

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