Mozambique | African Wildlife Foundation

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More than half of its wildlife is gone forever

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Mozambique

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  • Banhine National Park Revitalization
  • Banhine National Park Revitalization AWF
  • Banhine National Park Revitalization Harry Van Der Linder
  • Banhine National Park Revitalization AWF
  • Mozambique Harry Van Der Linder
  • Mozambique Harry Van Der Linder
  • Mozambique Harry Van Der Linder
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  • Limpopo Harry Van Der Linder
  • Limpopo Harry Van Der Linder
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Overview

Balancing its natural beauty and natural resources.

Located on the southeast coast of Africa, the Republic of Mozambique is divided into two regions by the Zambezi River. The north features a narrow coastline, low plateaus, and rugged highlands. The south has broad lowlands. It also holds Niassa Reserve, one of the largest protected areas in the country. This stunning and remote area has more than 350 African wild dogs, 12,000 sable antelopes, and 16,000 elephants.

Filled with rich and extensive natural resources, Mozambique has enjoyed a growing economy based on agriculture, food and beverage processing, aluminum production, petroleum production, and chemical manufacturing. More than 75% of Mozambicans do small-scale farming. In 2012, large natural gas reserves were found, which could have a huge impact on the economy.

And while its economy continues to flourish, it still remains one of the poorest in the world. 

Challenges

Since 1975, 70% of the wildlife in Mozambique has been lost.

While the economy is flourishing, the same can’t be said for wildlife in Mozambique. The lack of economic opportunities for all people has forced Mozambicans to overuse their natural resources, such as timber for fuel. The magnitude of this has resulted in a deforestation rate of 1% a year and the loss of 70% of their wildlife.

The Mozambique government realizes actions speak louder than words and is undertaking large conservation efforts both on land and water. Mozambique is now committed to protecting areas like Quirimbas National Park, Bazaruto National Park, and Lake Niassa Reserve. In 2012, it also created the largest coastal/marine reserve in Africa with the Primeiras and Segundas (P&S) Archipelago Environmental Protection Area, an archipelago chain of 10 islands that feature some of Africa’s most flourishing marine life and coral reefs. 

As poachers continue to kill for bushmeat and ivory and people steal natural resources, Mozambique is now at a crossroads. Mozambicans must be provided opportunities to pursue sustainable livelihood, take steps toward conservation, and build an infrastructure that fosters more economic opportunities.

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Will you show Mozambique your support?

With your help, African Wildlife Foundation can continue working on vital efforts like new enterprises that help sustain livelihoods, prevent poaching, and encourage conservation education. Donate for a cause that will help the people of Mozambique, their land, and wildlife conservation.

  • Zambezi Elephant Conservation
    Securing habitats for Southern Africa’s giants

    Elephants don’t know borders.

    Elephant populations in Southern Africa roam freely across many countries, seeking food, water, and suitable habitat. As a result,...

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  • Limpopo Leopard Conservation
    Studying leopards to ensure their future

    Little is known about the leopard’s conservation status.

    Leopards are solitary, nocturnal creatures that prefer to live in dense bush where their camouflage helps...

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  • Banhine National Park Revitalization
    Restoring a jewel of Mozambique

    Banhine is an overlooked but rich national park. 

    Southern Africa’s vast transnational Limpopo Heartland is perhaps best known for the world-famous Kruger National...

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    All Projects

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