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Advancing community conservation in rural DRC

Photo of small-scale forest community farmers on farm in DRC

  

Extremely remote, Maringa-Lopori-Wamba is one of the least-developed regions in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is a vast landscape measuring 74,000 sq. km—covered in rainforest, swamps, and rivers—with no roads and where the population faces extreme poverty. Spreading the message of conservation is not easy.

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Conservation enterprise secures biodiversity in Campo Ma'an

Rangers walking through dense forest in Campo Ma'an National Park in Cameroon

        

Established in 2000, Campo Ma’an National Park is a protected area in southern Cameroon created as environmental compensation for the controversial Chad-Cameroon Pipeline. The 2,460km sq. park neighbors five logging concessions, and agro-industries for palm oil and rubber—all within the Campo Ma’an Operational Technical Unit.

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7 ways to give back to wildlife during this holiday season

Image of four zebras on a plain

During this holiday season, treat your loved ones to gifts that also give back to Africa’s wildlife—or put these items on your own wishlist.

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Supporting wildlife species in the face of climate change

Herd of African elephants, giraffe and marabou stork walking in dry Tsavo landscape

    

Shifting weather patterns have complex impacts on natural systems, many of which are the cornerstone of Africa’s economic developments as it grows rapidly. The continent’s biodiversity is a vital natural resource at stake as overall temperatures rise. With rainfall projected to increase in eastern Africa but significantly reduce in the south, the risk of flash floods and harsh droughts is high.

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Humans are the biggest threat to Africa’s wildlife

Herd of elephants graphic asking where the species is headed

     

The energy, food and financial needs of our species pit us against various flora and fauna in our complex ecosystems. But human encroachment on habitats and migration routes is not the only way we are facing off with wildlife. Humans are also actively wiping out iconic species like the elephant, lion, and rhino by turning them into commodities.

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