Our Mission

Our Mission

African Wildlife Foundation's mission is to ensure wildlife and wild lands thrive in modern Africa.

  • Spread the word

pie chart

How we use donations

87% Programs
10% Fundraising
3% Administrative

View Annual Report

Donate With Confidence

Show me an Africa that's

Where We Work

Learn more

Where We Work

Elephant

Elephant
Herd of African elephants, giraffe and marabou stork walking in dry Tsavo landscape

Supporting wildlife species in the face of climate change

    

Shifting weather patterns have complex impacts on natural systems, many of which are the cornerstone of Africa’s economic developments as it grows rapidly. The continent’s biodiversity is a vital natural resource at stake as overall temperatures rise. With

Read More

Blog

All blogs

Hippopotamus

Hippopotamus
African Wildlife Foundation Names New Chief Executive Officer

African Wildlife Foundation Names New Chief Executive Officer

“Tom is a natural-born leader whose impressive career and abilities are matched by his drive, passion for

Read More

News

All news

Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros
Featured Projects
Bale Mountain Lodge

Endemic species are under threat.

Bale Mountains National Park, part of Ethiopia’s signature highlands, is home to species found in no other country on Earth, like the gelada baboon and Ethiopian wolf. Yet local communities rely on natural resources for their livelihoods, and encroachment from agriculture, grazing and settlement is shrinking the...

Read more

Featured Projects

All projects
Did you know?
Rare today, herds of 100 or more roan antelopes were common in the past. 
Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Nimule

Nimule

Investment in Africa

Learn more

Investment in Africa
Close-up photo of young bonobo on bamboo shoot

Strengthening bonobo conservation through satellite technology

      

Compared to Africa’s other great apes, the bonobo has been relatively less studied. Its geographic range stretches 500,000 square kilometers across the Democratic Republic of Congo’s remotest tropical forests — difficult to reach areas with a history of

Read More

Blog

All blogs

Classroom Africa

Classroom Africa
New Mountain Gorilla Census Reveals Unprecedented Results

New Mountain Gorilla Census Reveals Unprecedented Results

Today the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) celebrates a conservation win for mountain gorillas after a new census

Read More

News

All news

Save the Vulnerable Ones

Save the Vulnerable Ones
Featured Projects
Simien Mountains Cultural Tourism

Communities need help balancing their needs and the needs of their environment.

Ethiopia’s highlands are among the most densely populated agricultural areas in Africa. Agriculture is the major source of livelihood for communities living here, but shifting cultivation, overgrazing and agricultural expansion are putting serious strain on the surrounding...

Read more

Featured Projects

All projects

Imatong-Kidepo

Imatong-Kidepo

Simien Mountains

Simien Mountains
Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Dja

Dja

Forest Elephant

Forest Elephant
Aerial photo of agricultural plantations in Kilombero Valley, Southern Tanzania

Southern Tanzania shines as a model for green growth

                                      

With the planet’s human population projected to reach 9 billion by 2050, the demand for arable land to produce food, fuel and fiber is on the rise. Many look to Africa to meet this demand, viewing the continent as replete

Read More

Blog

All blogs

Gelada

Gelada
Photo of herd of African elephants in dusty savannah landscape

How to win the fight to save Africa's elephants and rhinos

   

Where previously poachers were subsistence or small-scale operators, now, organized groups engage in ruthless killing sprees. Poaching in Africa today involves militias, crime networks, and even terrorist groups motivated by the demand for ivory and rhino horn

Read More

Blog

All blogs

Save Valley

Save Valley
Featured Projects
Campo Ma’an Anti-Poaching Patrols

Untapped tourism potential

With its accessibility to Cameroon’s capital city, as well as its proximity to white-sand beaches, Campo Ma’an National Park is ripe with tourism potential. This forested park boasts a variety of species, including the forest elephant, pangolin and leopard. It is also among the few places in Africa where gorillas and...

Read more

Featured Projects

All projects

Bili Uele

Bili Uele
Did you know?
Deforestation affects Africa at twice the global average. 
Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

loading
SHOW ME MORE