Our Mission

Our Mission

African Wildlife Foundation's mission is to ensure wildlife and wild lands thrive in modern Africa.

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How we use donations

87% Programs
10% Fundraising
3% Administrative

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Where We Work

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Where We Work

Rhinoceros

Rhinoceros
Pastoralist cattle grazing and people washing clothes at river in Samburu

Balancing wildlife conservation and livelihoods on Kenya’s group ranches

    

Group ranches host significant proportions of Kenya’s terrestrial wildlife populations—including elephants that live outside or use lands beyond protected areas—and are predominantly inhabited by pastoralists. Since its implementation in the 1960s, the group

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Blog

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Elephant

Elephant
New Study Reveals Illegal Wildlife Trade Now Exists on Darknet

New Study Reveals Illegal Wildlife Trade Now Exists on Darknet

New research by INTERPOL has found limited, but clear evidence of criminals using the Darknet to sell illicit wildlife products from

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News

All news

Hippopotamus

Hippopotamus
Featured Projects
Campo Ma’an Anti-Poaching Patrols

Untapped tourism potential

With its accessibility to Cameroon’s capital city, as well as its proximity to white-sand beaches, Campo Ma’an National Park is ripe with tourism potential. This forested park boasts a variety of species, including the forest elephant, pangolin and leopard. It is also among the few places in Africa where gorillas and...

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Featured Projects

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Did you know?
Rare today, herds of 100 or more roan antelopes were common in the past. 
Reason #37 to get involved

The Sekute Conservation Area has resulted in increased education and conservation in the region. With your support AWF can create more success stories like this one. 

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

West/Central Africa

West/Central Africa

Zambezi

Zambezi
Photo of family of 4 mountain gorillas in Virunga

Virunga: Mountain gorilla sanctuary under threat

          

There is greater biodiversity in Africa’s Albertine Rift region where Virunga National Park is located than in any other ecosystem in Africa. This richly diverse array of habitats is home to critical populations of the world’s last remaining mountain

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Blog

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Elephants can’t wait

Elephants can’t wait
Photo of small-scale forest community farmers on farm in DRC

Advancing community conservation in rural DRC

  

Extremely remote, Maringa-Lopori-Wamba is one of the least-developed regions in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is a vast landscape measuring 74,000 sq. km—covered in rainforest, swamps, and rivers—with no roads and where the population faces extreme

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Blog

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Climate Change

Climate Change
Featured Projects
Ilima Conservation Primary School

In a remote part of rural DRC, AWF built a different kind of primary school.When AWF arrived in Ilima, the local school was a ramshackle building that failed to serve the educational needs of its students. Located in a remote part of the forest in northwest DRC, Ilima’s community school rarely attracted the best teachers. Its isolated location and...

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Featured Projects

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Simien Mountains

Simien Mountains
Reason #74 to get involved

As poaching rates grow, canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

Imatong-Kidepo

Imatong-Kidepo

Dja

Dja
Photo of African wild dog in Southern Africa

Protecting the carnivores of Africa’s wild lands

          

Not only are carnivores critical to the long-term viability of ecosystems, their presence is also a strong indicator of healthy prey populations. As they face a combination of threats — retaliatory killings by livestock

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Blog

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West African Giraffe

West African Giraffe
Bwindi Mountain Gorilla Census

Bwindi Mountain Gorilla Census

Accurate population numbers are needed for gorilla conservation. The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda is home to approximately half of the world’s remaining...

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Projects

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Forest Elephant

Forest Elephant
Featured Projects
Chyulu Hills REDD+

In Africa, deforestation and climate change give real cause for concern.The African continent is anticipated to experience more than its fair share of climate change’s negative impacts. From extreme weather patterns to losses in crop productivity to an overall decrease in the quality of life for both the people and wildlife that call Africa “home,”...

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Featured Projects

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Save Valley

Save Valley
Did you know?
Predator-proof bomas have been used to lessen human-carnivore conflict. 
Reason #85 to get involved

AWF works with a host of partners on issues ranging from climate change to land conservation. Projects like Kolo Hills REDD+ are examples of our continued success working with partners. 

Reason #53 to get involved

With loss of habitat and prey, carnivores—like cheetahs and wild dogs—are hunting community livestock. As a result, farmers are forced to kill these species. African Wildlife Foundation needs support training scouts and funding bomas to protect livestock as well as negotiating buffer zones for wildlife.

Reason #82 to get involved

Adapting to their recent human neighbors, vervet monkeys steal food and raid crops. As a result, humans mass-poison the monkeys to defend their food sources. Help is needed to establish a buffer zone so both humans and monkeys can coexist.

Reason #3 to get involved

AWF is fostering new and innovative solutions to the problems posed by a rapidly developing Africa which remains home to vulnerable and endangered species.

Reason #21 to get involved

African Wildlife Foundation is devoted entirely to, and ever-present in, African wildlife conservation and sustainable development—recognizing and responding to critical threats in a multifaceted way. Help all of Africa, the wildlife, the communities, and the future.

Reason #11 to get involved

Wildlife corridors allow migratory species, like the wildebeest and zebra, to roam safely. Without intervention, these free spaces are threatened by increasing development and agriculture. 

Reason #50 to get involved

Fewer than 900 mountain gorillas exist today. They live in areas suffering from the effects of civil war, poverty, poaching, and disease. Help fund efforts that include protecting gorilla habitats and keeping peace between locals and wildlife.

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