African Wild Dog

Maasai Steppe Predator-Proof Bomas

Lions face violence from local pastoralists. 

Lion populations across Africa face many threats to their continued existence. Habitat loss, disease, and violence all threaten the future of these majestic predators. In the Maasai Steppe Heartland, lions are often targeted for death after killing livestock or scaring local pastoralists. As a result, lion numbers are decreasing, as humans and carnivores grow to be more at odds with each other. 

Ruaha Carnivore Project

A critical location for Africa’s top predators.

Across the continent, Africa’s large carnivores are facing an uncertain future. Lions, cheetahs and African wild dogs have all disappeared from 80 – 90 percent of their original range. Both the lion and the cheetah are now classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN, with as few as 23,000 and 10,000 individuals remaining in the wild respectively. While the African wild dog is Endangered, with merely 6,600 estimated adults remaining.

Ol Pejeta Conservancy

Kenya’s herds are creating hurdles.

Boasting a scenic landscape and extensive wildlife, northern Kenya supports a critical population of wild dogs, the second-largest elephant population in Kenya, and one third of Kenya’s rhino population, as well as endangered northern savanna species such as the Grevy’s zebra.

Ol Lentille Lodge

Kenyan wildlife is diverse but threatened.

Kenya is home to some of Africa’s most diverse ecosystems and identifiable species. Lush savanna landscapes play host to the African wild dog, leopard, hyena, Grevy’s zebra, and kudu, among other wildlife, but these species and their homes are under constant threat from deforestation, poaching, and unsustainable agricultural practices. 

Mozambique

Balancing Mozambique’s natural beauty and natural resources.

Located on the southeast coast of Africa, the Republic of Mozambique is divided into two regions by the Zambezi River. The north features a narrow coastline, low plateaus, and rugged highlands and the south has broad lowlands. The savannah and dry woodland habitats near the border of South Africa's Kruger National Park are home to elephants, impala, duiker, springbok, kudu, and ostrich.

Botswana

Over half of Botswana is covered by the Kalahari Desert, yet it’s one of the world’s fastest-growing economies.

The Republic of Botswana may be one of the world’s most sparsely populated countries, but it also happens to be one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. Over the years, it has transformed into a middle-income country with a competitive banking system and a growing mineral industry that accounts for about 40 percent of its GDP.