East Africa

East Africa

Reason #67 to get involved

Already vulnerable to a number of natural predators, the kudu now faces loss of habitat due to habitat destruction and poaching. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you support local communities’ efforts to protect wildlife habitats.

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.

Reason #71 to get involved

Critically endangered black rhino lost an estimated 97.6% of its population since 1960 with numbers bottoming out at 2,410 in 1995. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you aid in the conservation and growth of endangered species like the rhino.

Reason #80 to get involved

In a 1900 census, the cheetah population was around 100,000. Today, less than 9,000 remain in Africa. With less prey and habitat—and pursued by hunters—the cheetah is at a high risk of extinction. With your help, AWF can continue providing incentives to locals to prevent hunting. 

Reason #74 to get involved

Our canine detection units are helping authorities detect even the smallest dustings of illegal wildlife products to stop wildlife traffickers in their steps.

Reason #24 to get involved

The African wild dog population numbers less than 5,000 individuals and continues to decline due to habitat fragmentation, human conflict, and widespread disease. Your support allows for wild dog scouts to monitor and protect this species. 

Healthy lion populations provide significant ecosystem benefits

A new report supported by African Wildlife Foundation and others details the valuable ecosystem services provided by "lionscapes," or landscapes in which lions thrive as apex predators.

Lionscapes offer a larger than average share of:

  • direct benefits such as water and food security
  • supporting services such as photosynthesis, soil formation, and nutrient cycling
  • regulating services such as soil stability and carbon storage
  • cultural value in the recreational, historical, aesthetic, and even spiritual realms

 

AWF Hosts the First-Ever National African Lion Survey Training

Conservation organizations across Kenya have convened for a week-long National Lion Survey Training at the African Wildlife Foundation headquarters. This first-of-a-kind training held from February 8-11, 2020 has attracted several participants from different regions of Kenya. The participating organizations include the Kenya Wildlife Service, Wildlife Works, Tsavo Trust, Ewaso Lions, Born Free, University of Nairobi, Wildlife Conservation Society, Kenya Wildlife Trust, and Ol Pejeta Conservancy. Being the first-ever national lion census being conducted in Africa, it breaks ground for African leadership in conservation.

Lion-proof enclosures, beehive barriers, and chilies stem human-wildlife conflict

Bomas are traditional wooden or thorn-bush/wire mesh enclosures designed to keep cattle in and predators out. With help from African Wildlife Foundation, Tanzanian Maasai pastoralists living around Manyara Ranch have benefited from an upgrade: mobile, predator-proof, metal bomas.

Herders move with these enclosures and their cattle periodically, following water and grass growth. In this way they can help restore degraded habitat — rotating the livestock strategically, the herders help overgrazed areas to regenerate healthy grasses.

Rwanda

African Wildlife Foundation in partnership with the Government of Rwanda and Rwanda Development Board has expanded Africa’s oldest park for the first time in 30 years.

The 27.8-hectare of donated land is adjacent to Volcanoes National Park and is the narrowest part of the park in an area where endangered mountain gorillas often wander across the park boundary, which increases the risk of human-gorilla conflict and the danger of exposure to deadly disease.