Kenya

Tourism-dependent communities find a new lifeline

When African Wildlife Foundation designed its response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization knew that focusing only on wildlife and wild lands would fall short of mitigating the ongoing crisis. Our decades of experience in conservation in Africa continue to show that even the best designed conservation programs do not succeed when the needs of the communities living near wildlife remain unaddressed.

Stolen, lost, and broken: mismanaged evidence sets wildlife criminals free

The illegal trafficking of protected African wildlife species can take various gory forms across the continent. Wildlife management authorities and investigators often discover concealed elephant tusks still dripping with blood or even pieces of flesh and hides, but they are also likely to find crocodile eggs or pangolin scales. The contraband counts as evidence, as do the tools and weapons found at the crime scene, which can range from handmade bows and arrows to AK47s.

Wildlife and communities flourish on Kenya’s Olderkesi Conservancy

Developing: As I was writing about the incredible community conservation program at Olderkesi, the COVID-19 crisis was just developing. Now, as I finish this piece, unfortunately, much of the work outlined here is in great threat as tourism comes to a grinding halt in the wake of the pandemic. Cottar’s Safaris find themselves in the same position as most safari outfits. Tourism revenues have plummeted, threatening the wildlife living on this critical conservancy in the Mara and the livelihoods of the Maasai families who work at — and receive economic benefits from — the lodges.

French Development Agency (AFD)

French Development Agency (AFD)

AFD provides funding and technical assistance for development projects and programs that enhance sustainable and shared economic growth and improve living conditions for the poorest. It is also focused on preserving the environment and stabilizing countries in fragile situations.

Starbucks

Starbucks

AWF’s six-year partnership with Starbucks and 5,000 farmers under the Kenya Heartland Coffee Project delivered a bold blend of results for people and wildlife. This project boosted coffee production through farmer training on conservation friendly growing practices. It also established a quality lab which helped growers to monitor and refine their coffee. True to AWF’s mission and Starbucks’ commitment to social responsibility, this project aimed to foster an environmentally and economically vibrant landscape.

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.