Namibia

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.

Reason #71 to get involved

Critically endangered black rhino lost an estimated 97.6% of its population since 1960 with numbers bottoming out at 2,410 in 1995. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you aid in the conservation and growth of endangered species like the rhino.

Reason #80 to get involved

In a 1900 census, the cheetah population was around 100,000. Today, less than 9,000 remain in Africa. With less prey and habitat—and pursued by hunters—the cheetah is at a high risk of extinction. With your help, AWF can continue providing incentives to locals to prevent hunting. 

Sekute Conservation Area

Agriculture and population growth threaten wildlife in Zambia. 

Historically, wildlife roamed freely around the Sekute Chiefdom in southern Zambia. But, in recent years, human population growth, agricultural enterprise, and tourism-related development have threatened these critically important wildlife dispersal corridors. 

Grootberg Lodge

Namibia still faces eco-challenges.

Despite being at the forefront of conservation in Africa, Namibia still faces issues of poverty and habitat loss. Human-wildlife conflict still poses issues, and too often, communities do not see the benefits of the tourism businesses in their region. 

Rare desert elephants survive Namibia’s harshest drylands

The world’s largest terrestrial mammal is also famed for being notoriously water-dependent. African savannah elephants in temperate rangelands drink water almost daily and love a mudbath to stay cool. Yet, in northern Mali’s Gourma region and the vast Namib Desert, this fascinating pachyderm survives despite the low rainfall and intense heat. These herds, aptly named desert elephants, traverse long distances in brutal arid environments with only seasonal rivers and scant vegetation for sustenance.

Vulture

Poachers are poisoning these precious birds.