Tanzania

Tanzania

Reason #67 to get involved

Already vulnerable to a number of natural predators, the kudu now faces loss of habitat due to habitat destruction and poaching. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you support local communities’ efforts to protect wildlife habitats.

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.

Reason #71 to get involved

Critically endangered black rhino lost an estimated 97.6% of its population since 1960 with numbers bottoming out at 2,410 in 1995. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you aid in the conservation and growth of endangered species like the rhino.

Reason #80 to get involved

In a 1900 census, the cheetah population was around 100,000. Today, less than 9,000 remain in Africa. With less prey and habitat—and pursued by hunters—the cheetah is at a high risk of extinction. With your help, AWF can continue providing incentives to locals to prevent hunting. 

Tanzania

A third of Tanzania is protected.

From its stunning Indian Ocean beaches to the shores of Lake Victoria, from the arable plains of its central plateau to the heights of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania is a jewel of East Africa. It is the largest country in the region, formed in 1964 by the union of Tanganyika and Zanzibar. Among Tanzania’s neighbors are Kenya to the north and Mozambique to the south, with multiple landlocked nations to its west relying on it for access to the coast.

Communities in Kenya and Tanzania unite to save wildlife

At its southern reach, Kenya’s Tsavo Conservation Area crosses into Tanzania, encompassing Mkomazi National Park and critical dispersal areas for the region’s iconic wildlife. The area, covering more than 47,000 sq. kilometers, is home to more than a third of Kenya’s elephant population and 18 percent of its black rhinos. Comprising three national parks and reserves, as well as community conservancies and ranches, Tsavo is the biggest contiguous wildlife area in Kenya.

A drought-resistant seed boosts sugarcane yields, stops habitat loss in southern Tanzania

Sugarcane grown in southern Tanzania’s Kilombero landscape makes up 33 percent of the total sugar produced in the country. African Wildlife Foundation partner Kilombero Sugar Company, the largest sugar producer in Tanzania, works with 8,000 outgrower sugarcane farmers who supply the company to complement harvests from its plantations.