Colobus Monkey

Sekute Conservation Area

Agriculture and population growth threaten wildlife in Zambia. 

Historically, wildlife roamed freely around the Sekute Chiefdom in southern Zambia. But, in recent years, human population growth, agricultural enterprise, and tourism-related development have threatened these critically important wildlife dispersal corridors. 

Amboseli-Chyulu Wildlife Corridor

Amboseli­-Chyulu Corridor is threatened by agricultural expansion.

The historic wildlife dispersal area and corridor that extends from Amboseli National Park to Chyulu Hills and Tsavo West National Park represents a critical asset to the survival of wildlife in these protected areas. The corridor allows for the free movement, and is one of the last natural strongholds, of lion, zebra, elephant, giraffe, and other species.

Rwanda

African Wildlife Foundation in partnership with the Government of Rwanda and Rwanda Development Board has expanded Africa’s oldest park for the first time in 30 years.

The 27.8-hectare of donated land is adjacent to Volcanoes National Park and is the narrowest part of the park in an area where endangered mountain gorillas often wander across the park boundary, which increases the risk of human-gorilla conflict and the danger of exposure to deadly disease.

Kenya

In Kenya, conservation is a cornerstone of the economy.

Kenya is a country of diverse, rich habitat. The humid broadleaf forests along the coast of the Indian Ocean give way to lush grasslands and savannas. The Kenya Lake System of the geologically dramatic Great Rift Valley is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. And, Mount Kenya — the nation’s namesake — is the second-tallest mountain on the continent.

Cameroon

Rich biodiversity earned it the nickname “Africa in miniature.”

Cameroon has often been called “Africa in miniature” for how much it mirrors the continent’s diversity. Like the continent it calls home, Cameroon boasts a coastline, mountains, savanna, desert, and tropical rainforests.