Leopard

Maasai Steppe Predator-Proof Bomas

Lions face violence from local pastoralists. 

Lion populations across Africa face many threats to their continued existence. Habitat loss, disease, and violence all threaten the future of these majestic predators. In the Maasai Steppe Heartland, lions are often targeted for death after killing livestock or scaring local pastoralists. As a result, lion numbers are decreasing, as humans and carnivores grow to be more at odds with each other. 

Satao Elerai Lodge

Kenyan wildlife is diverse but threatened.

Kenya is home to some of Africa’s most diverse ecosystems and identifiable species. Lush savanna landscapes play host to the African wild dog, leopard, hyena, Grevy’s zebra, and kudu, among other wildlife, but, unfortunately, these species and their homes are under constant threat from deforestation, poaching, and unsustainable agricultural practices.

Ol Lentille Lodge

Kenyan wildlife is diverse but threatened.

Kenya is home to some of Africa’s most diverse ecosystems and identifiable species. Lush savanna landscapes play host to the African wild dog, leopard, hyena, Grevy’s zebra, and kudu, among other wildlife, but these species and their homes are under constant threat from deforestation, poaching, and unsustainable agricultural practices. 

Limpopo Leopard Conservation

Little is known about the leopard’s conservation status.

Leopards are solitary, nocturnal creatures that prefer to live in dense bush where their camouflage helps them to hide effectively. It is for these reasons, perhaps, that there is little information available regarding leopard populations and their current conservation status.

Campo Ma’an Anti-Poaching Patrols

 

Untapped tourism potential

 

With its accessibility to Cameroon’s capital city, as well as its proximity to white-sand beaches, Campo Ma’an National Park is ripe with tourism potential. This forested park boasts a variety of species, including the forest elephant, pangolin and leopard. It is also among the few places in Africa where gorillas and chimpanzees coexist—an alluring characteristic for wildlife enthusiasts.

Amboseli-Chyulu Wildlife Corridor

Amboseli­-Chyulu Corridor is threatened by agricultural expansion.

The historic wildlife dispersal area and corridor that extends from Amboseli National Park to Chyulu Hills and Tsavo West National Park represents a critical asset to the survival of wildlife in these protected areas. The corridor allows for the free movement, and is one of the last natural strongholds, of lion, zebra, elephant, giraffe, and other species.

South Africa

South Africa is one of the world’s most diverse countries.

The Republic of South Africa is in the southernmost region of the continent. Its long coastline stretches along the South Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean for more than 2,400 kilometers (1,500 miles). While its coastline is lush, the rest of its geography is vast, flat, sparsely populated, and dry. More than 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) south of the mainland lie the Prince Edward Islands, a small sub-Antarctic archipelago.

Zambia

Copper isn’t Zambia’s only rich natural resource.

The Republic of Zambia is located in Southern Africa. Its name comes from the Zambezi river, which flows through parts of the country and also forms its southern border. Zambia has a tropical climate, high plateaus, broad plains, and river valleys.

Kenya

In Kenya, conservation is a cornerstone of the economy.

Kenya is a country of diverse, rich habitat. The humid broadleaf forests along the coast of the Indian Ocean give way to lush grasslands and savannas. The Kenya Lake System of the geologically dramatic Great Rift Valley is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. And, Mount Kenya — the nation’s namesake — is the second-tallest mountain on the continent.