Southern Africa

Turning to conservation as severe droughts, food insecurity spike

By the time the rains had failed yet again in October 2019, more than 100 elephants had already succumbed to the southern drought in Zimbabwe alone. One of the harshest dry periods experienced in the region in the last four decades, the extended drought disappeared water sources across shrinking grazing areas. Wildlife mortalities continued to rise in Zimbabwe’s iconic protected areas, most notably in Hwange and Mana Pools National Parks.

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.

Reason #71 to get involved

Critically endangered black rhino lost an estimated 97.6% of its population since 1960 with numbers bottoming out at 2,410 in 1995. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you aid in the conservation and growth of endangered species like the rhino.

Reason #80 to get involved

In a 1900 census, the cheetah population was around 100,000. Today, less than 9,000 remain in Africa. With less prey and habitat—and pursued by hunters—the cheetah is at a high risk of extinction. With your help, AWF can continue providing incentives to locals to prevent hunting. 

Reason #24 to get involved

The African wild dog population numbers less than 5,000 individuals and continues to decline due to habitat fragmentation, human conflict, and widespread disease. Your support allows for wild dog scouts to monitor and protect this species. 

Healthy lion populations provide significant ecosystem benefits

A new report supported by African Wildlife Foundation and others details the valuable ecosystem services provided by "lionscapes," or landscapes in which lions thrive as apex predators.

Lionscapes offer a larger than average share of:

  • direct benefits such as water and food security
  • supporting services such as photosynthesis, soil formation, and nutrient cycling
  • regulating services such as soil stability and carbon storage
  • cultural value in the recreational, historical, aesthetic, and even spiritual realms

 

Ngoma Lodge

A national park too small to house African wildlife.

Chobe National Park in Northern Botswana is densely populated by wildlife and boasts a large elephant population. Unfortunately, the park itself cannot provide sufficient room for all of its animal residents to roam comfortably. As a result, animals often stray beyond the borders of the park, making them vulnerable to poaching.