Botswana

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.

Reason #71 to get involved

Critically endangered black rhino lost an estimated 97.6% of its population since 1960 with numbers bottoming out at 2,410 in 1995. When you support African Wildlife Foundation, you aid in the conservation and growth of endangered species like the rhino.

Reason #24 to get involved

The African wild dog population numbers less than 5,000 individuals and continues to decline due to habitat fragmentation, human conflict, and widespread disease. Your support allows for wild dog scouts to monitor and protect this species. 

Ngoma Lodge

A national park too small to house African wildlife.

Chobe National Park in Northern Botswana is densely populated by wildlife and boasts a large elephant population. Unfortunately, the park itself cannot provide sufficient room for all of its animal residents to roam comfortably. As a result, animals often stray beyond the borders of the park, making them vulnerable to poaching. 

Sekute Conservation Area

Agriculture and population growth threaten wildlife in Zambia. 

Historically, wildlife roamed freely around the Sekute Chiefdom in southern Zambia. But, in recent years, human population growth, agricultural enterprise, and tourism-related development have threatened these critically important wildlife dispersal corridors. 

Botswana

Over half of Botswana is covered by the Kalahari Desert, yet it’s one of the world’s fastest-growing economies.

The Republic of Botswana may be one of the world’s most sparsely populated countries, but it also happens to be one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. Over the years, it has transformed into a middle-income country with a competitive banking system and a growing mineral industry that accounts for about 40 percent of its GDP.

Pushing for stronger penalties to deter wildlife crimes

Photo of two white rhinos grazing in open savannah grassland in Botswana
  

Botswana’s Wildlife Conservation and National Parks Act (or the Wildlife Act) enforces the protection of wild species and natural habitats, with a particular focus on keystone species slaughtered for the illegal trade in wildlife products. Offenses against rhinos attract both the highest fine — BWP 100,000 ($ 10,000) — as well as the longest prison term of 15 years. Other offenses involving the illegal killing of wildlife, hunting without permits, trade in wildlife and wildlife products, and dealing in wildlife trophies carry high prison terms ranging from five to 10 years.

Robust legal safeguards secure Botswana’s wildlife

Close-up photo of adult elephant amongst herd of elephants in Botswana
 

Botswana is indeed one of the success stories in wildlife conservation on the continent.  It has the largest population of elephants in Africa with about 200,000 individuals. To protect this large herd, along with other iconic wildlife species, the government has put in place strong measures to protect wildlife against criminal threats such as poaching and trafficking.  As African Wildlife Foundation’s Wildlife Law Enforcement team prepares for the Wildlife Judicial and Prosecutorial Assistance Training in Botswana from June 5-7, 2018, we recognize the strides that the southern African country has made to protect its wildlife. For example, the Botswana Defence Forces are committed to protecting wildlife and fighting poaching in protected areas.

Vulture

Poachers are poisoning these precious birds.