Mozambique

Reason #70 to get involved

AWF protects nearly 40 % of Africa's elephants. Support our programs to stop elephant poaching and ivory trafficking.

Reason #80 to get involved

In a 1900 census, the cheetah population was around 100,000. Today, less than 9,000 remain in Africa. With less prey and habitat—and pursued by hunters—the cheetah is at a high risk of extinction. With your help, AWF can continue providing incentives to locals to prevent hunting. 

Zambezi Elephant Conservation

Elephants don’t know borders.

Elephant populations in Southern Africa roam freely across many countries, seeking food, water, and suitable habitat. As a result, monitoring, protecting, and securing habitats for elephant herds is particularly difficult.

Limpopo Leopard Conservation

Little is known about the leopard’s conservation status.

Leopards are solitary, nocturnal creatures that prefer to live in dense bush where their camouflage helps them to hide effectively. It is for these reasons, perhaps, that there is little information available regarding leopard populations and their current conservation status.

Banhine National Park Revitalization

Banhine is an overlooked but rich national park. 

Southern Africa’s vast transnational Limpopo Heartland is perhaps best known for the world-famous Kruger National Park. Yet not far away, in Mozambique, is an equally fascinating park that is virtually unknown: Banhine National Park.

Mozambique

Balancing Mozambique’s natural beauty and natural resources.

Located on the southeast coast of Africa, the Republic of Mozambique is divided into two regions by the Zambezi River. The north features a narrow coastline, low plateaus, and rugged highlands and the south has broad lowlands. The savannah and dry woodland habitats near the border of South Africa's Kruger National Park are home to elephants, impala, duiker, springbok, kudu, and ostrich.

Vulture

Poachers are poisoning these precious birds.

Zebra

Habitat loss and competition w