• Spread the word

Blog

South Africa’s newly legalized rhino horn trade could fuel Chinese demand

Photo of dehorned rhino in South Africa

 

In April 2017, a court ruling in South Africa overturned the government’s 2009 moratorium on domestic rhino horn trade and passed legislation permitting sales within the country. If leaders of other governments fail to communicate where they stand on rhino conservation, this legislation could prove disastrous for Africa’s already dwindling rhino population.

Continue reading

Combating rhino horn demand in Vietnam

Close-up of grazing rhino showing full horns

 

No scientific evidence proves rhino horn to be a magical cure-all for ailments ranging from cancer to hangovers, yet poachers decimate rhino populations. In demand centers across China and Southeast Asia, an upwardly mobile market continues to seek out rhino horn as a high-status multipurpose medicine.

Continue reading

Balancing wildlife conservation and livelihoods on Kenya’s group ranches

Pastoralist cattle grazing and people washing clothes at river in Samburu

 

Group ranches host significant proportions of Kenya’s terrestrial wildlife populations—including elephants that live outside or use lands beyond protected areas—and are predominantly inhabited by pastoralists. Since its implementation in the 1960s, the group ranch model has struggled to meet the demands of rising human and livestock populations and climate change impacts. Constrained by a lack of open space critical to their livelihood and facing dwindling prospects, group ranch pastoralists are increasingly sedentarized and diversifying into cultivation and tourism, often at the expense of wildlife populations and ecological processes.

Continue reading

Improving Tanzania’s small-scale agriculture to promote biodiversity

Photo of crop fields in Kilombero, Tanzania

 

The population of the Kilombero District in Tanzania is heavily reliant on agriculture. Approximately 100,000 small-scale farmers cultivate predominantly rice and cocoa. On average, their fields are only around 0.5 hectares in size. Roughly 35% of the farmers are female. Economic dependence and lack of management knowledge lead to high losses during both harvest and processing, resulting in insufficient income.

Continue reading

If a rhino could speak he’d beg the world to stop poaching

African Wildlife Foundation is committed to a holistic, three-pronged approach to saving Africa’s most threatened species. That means we not only stop the killing by protecting species, like the rhinoceros, on the ground but also work to stop wildlife trafficking and stop the demand.

Continue reading

Pages